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Luna Park at Coney Island

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Luna Park at Coney Island

A rendering of the evocative front gate at the new Luna Park at Coney Island.

NYCEDC, 2010. Used with permission.
Opened in 2010 on the site of the shuttered Astroland, Luna Park is the first phase of Coney Island's much-heralded rebirth and represents a private-public partnership to help restore The People's Playground to its former glory. At a little over three acres, the park is quite small, but it does pack 19 rides into its compact footprint. Most of the attractions are of the spinning variety (affectionately referred to in the industry as whirl-and-hurl or spin-and-puke rides) and all are off-the-shelf models manufactured by Italy's Zamperla. Luna Park also offers games, food concessions, including a cafe with a relatively extensive menu, live entertainment, and shops.

The park takes its name from the original Luna Park, which operated at Coney Island from 1903 to 1946. While the 21st-century Luna Park has echoes of its famous predecessor, including the whimsical crescent moons and bright orange discs that grace its main entrance, it doesn't aspire to the ornate architecture, with its grand "Court of Honor," or the ambitious attractions that characterized the first park.

As its centerpiece, Luna Park features the Astro Tower. The landmark, however, no longer includes the observation deck that once took passengers up and down its tower. Luna Park is flanked on one side by The Cyclone, but the iconic roller coaster is operated independently.

In 2011, the company that operates Luna Park is planning to open the Scream Zone, which will bring a slingshot tower ride, go-karts, and two custom roller coasters to Coney Island.

Location and Phone:

Luna Park at Coney Island is in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, along the ocean.

718-373-LUNA (5862)

Tickets and Admission Policy:

There are no gates, and admission to the amusement area is free. Guests can either purchase points and pay a la carte for rides and attractions using a debit system or buy an unlimited ride wristband.

Directions:

The address is 1000 Surf Avenue

Subway: D, F, N, or Q train to Stilwell Ave., the end of the line.

Driving: Belt Parkway to Exit 6. South on Cropsey Ave. toward Coney Island. Cropsey becomes W 17th St. Left onto Surf Ave. to Coney Island's amusement area.

Parking: There are meters on the streets and parking lots in the area. On busy weekends, if everything appears to be full, you could drive about a mile away to Brighton Beach, which has a large parking lot, and walk the boardwalk back to Coney Island.

Rides and Highlights:

Luna Park features mostly off-the-shelf spinning rides, including:
  • Air Race- Riders pilot their own planes around a "control tower" in this spinning ride. Air Race made its world debut at Luna Park.
  • Electro Spin- A Disk'O, which is a combination spinning ride and coaster. Riders sit facing outward on a spinning platform that travels back and forth along a u-shaped track.
  • Eclipse- A pendulum ride that swings riders back on a forth on a spinning platform.
  • Lunar Express- A small family roller coaster.

Pictures:

Halloween Event at Luna Park:

More Coney Island Info:

Luna Park is one of a number of concessions along the boardwalk at Coney Island, including Deno's Wonder Wheel Park (which offers a number of rides in addition to the iconic Ferris wheel), The Cyclone roller coaster, The New York Aquarium, and the original Nathan's Famous. Learn more about Coney Island:

Official Web Site

Luna Park
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